Janice Adore

6 Ways To Use Copaiba Essential Oil

I had a few questions about the Copaiba essential oil since Canada today became the first major world economy to legalize marijuana. 6 ways to use Copaiba essential oil via Young Living.

6 ways to use Copaiba essential oil

Open a bottle of Copaiba essential oil and let the scent of the Amazon rainforest out. Steam distilled and resin tapped from the Brazilian Copaifera reticulata tree, Copaiba essential oil features a warm, woodsy scent and includes the naturally occurring constituent beta-caryophyllene, making it a popular addition to many spa and skin treatments. With a comforting, earthy aroma and a myriad of uses, Copaiba is the perfect daily indulgence to feel transported to a lush South American landscape. Read on for our favorite ways to use Copaiba oil.

1. In your moisturizerCopaiba Essential Oil benefits and uses- Young Living

Does your skin need a pick-me-up? Copaiba essential oil reduces the appearance of blemishes and promotes the appearance of a youthful, radiant glow. Add a few drops to a neutral or lightly scented moisturizer for a spa-like experience every evening before bed.

2. As a perfume

Copaiba oil has a uniquely sweet aromatic profile, which won’t overpower soft florals or subtle hints of citrus. Use it in customized perfumes in place of other woodsy oils like Cedarwood or Royal Hawaiian Sandalwoodfor a more delicate summer fragrance that won’t be overpowering in warmer temperatures.

3. In the diffuser

With a scent straight out of the Amazon, Copaiba puts the experience of a rainforest hideout just a few drops away. Put on some nature sounds and fill a room with this exotic aroma:

4. During a massage 

After a hard workout, strenuous hike, or overall stressful day, share a Copaiba massage with a loved one. Dilute Copaiba with V-6™ Vegetable Oil Complex or a carrier oil of your choice and massage on fatigued areas after activity for a comforting cooldown.

5. In your dietCopaiba essential oil Vitality Young Living

Copaiba has a soothing, complex flavor with a hint of balsamic. Its high beta-caryophyllene content makes it a popular dietary supplement. Young Living’s Copaiba Vitality™ is labeled for internal use and makes a great addition to herbal teas such as chamomile or rooibos. It can also be added to a capsuleand taken internally.

6. In a foot soak

Imagine yourself at a spa in the Brazilian rainforest. If you can’t get away, bring the spa to you with a luxurious foot soak. This spa-inspired Tropical Resort Foot Soak recipe will whisk you away and soothe muscles at the end of a long day.

Tropical Resort Foot Soak

Ingredients:PanAway essential oil benefits and uses

Directions:

  1. Mix Epsom salt and essential oils in a small bowl.
  2. Add salt mixture to warm water.
  3. Sit back, relax, and let your feet soak for 15–30 minutes.

What is your favorite way to use Copaiba essential oil? If this Copaiba Essential oil is for you, I’m accepting request to order it.

Let us know in the comments below!

xxxxx,

Janice

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The Mistake I Made With My Grieving Friend

A good friend of mine lost her dad some years back. I found her sitting alone on a bench outside our workplace, not moving, just staring at the horizon. She was absolutely distraught and I didn’t know what to say to her. It’s so easy to say the wrong thing to someone who is grieving and vulnerable. So, I started talking about how I grew up without a father. I told her that my dad had drowned in a submarine when I was only 9 months old and I’d always mourned his loss, even though I’d never known him. I just wanted her to realize that she wasn’t alone, that I’d been through something similar and could understand how she felt.

But after I related this story, my friend looked at me and snapped, “Okay, Celeste, you win. You never had a dad, and I at least got to spend 30 years with mine. You had it worse. I guess I shouldn’t be so upset that my dad just died.”

I was stunned and mortified. My immediate reaction was to plead my case. “No, no, no,” I said, “that’s not what I’m saying at all. I just meant that I know how you feel.” And she answered, “No, Celeste, you don’t. You have no idea how I feel.”

She walked away and I stood there helplessly, watching her go and feeling like a jerk. I had totally failed my friend. I had wanted to comfort her, and instead, I’d made her feel worse. At that point, I still felt she misunderstood me. I thought she was in a fragile state and had lashed out at me unfairly when I was only trying to help.

But the truth is, she didn’t misunderstand me at all. She understood what was happening perhaps better than I did. When she began to share her raw emotions, I felt uncomfortable. I didn’t know what to say, so I defaulted to a subject with which I was comfortable: myself.

I may have been trying to empathize, at least on a conscious level, but what I really did was draw focus away from her anguish and turn the attention to me. She wanted to talk to me about her father, to tell me about the kind of man he was, so I could fully appreciate the magnitude of her loss. Instead, I asked her to stop for a moment and listen to my story about my dad’s tragic death.

From that day forward, I started to notice how often I responded to stories of loss and struggle with stories of my own experiences. My son would tell me about clashing with a kid in Boy Scouts, and I would talk about a girl I fell out with in college. When a co-worker got laid off, I told her about how much I struggled to find a job after I had been laid off years earlier. But when I began to pay a little more attention to how people responded to my attempts to empathize, I realized the effect of sharing my experiences was never as I intended. What all of these people needed was for me to hear them and acknowledge what they were going through. Instead, I forced them to listen to me and acknowledge me.

Sociologist Charles Derber describes this tendency to insert oneself into a conversation as “conversational narcissism.” It’s the desire to take over a conversation, to do most of the talking and to turn the focus of the exchange to yourself. It is often subtle and unconscious. Derber writes that conversational narcissism “is the key manifestation of the dominant attention-getting psychology in America. It occurs in informal conversations among friends, family and co-workers. The profusion of popular literature about listening and the etiquette of managing those who talk constantly about themselves suggests its pervasiveness in everyday life.” Derber describes two kinds of responses in conversations: a shift response and a support response. The first shifts attention back to yourself, and the second supports the other person’s comment. Here is a simple illustration:

Shift Response
Mary: I’m so busy right now.
Tim: Me too. I’m totally overwhelmed.

Support Response
Mary: I’m so busy right now.
Tim: Why? What do you have to get done?

Here’s another example:

Shift Response
Karen: I need new shoes.
Mark: Me too. These things are falling apart.

Support Response
Karen: I need new shoes.
Mark: Oh yeah? What kind are you thinking about?

Shift responses are a hallmark of conversational narcissism. They help you turn the focus constantly back to yourself. But a support response encourages the other person to continue their story. These days, I try to be more aware of my instinct to share stories and talk about myself. I try to ask questions that encourage the other person to continue. I’ve also made a conscious effort to listen more and talk less.

Recently, I had a long conversation with a friend of mine who was going through a divorce. We spent almost 40 minutes on the phone, and I barely said a word. At the end of our call, she said, “Thank you for your advice. You’ve really helped me work some things out.” The truth is, I hadn’t actually offered any advice; most of what I said was a version of “That sounds tough. I’m sorry this is happening to you.” She didn’t need advice or stories from me. She just needed to be heard. The author of We Need to Talk reveals how she learned to help — and not help — a friend with loss. This excerpt was taken from We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations That Matter, by Celeste Headlee. Headlee is the host of the daily news show On Second Thought on Georgia Public Radio. Photo: Simone Golob/Getty Images. Via Huffpost Celeste HeadleeOprah.com

xxxx,

Janice

This Is What ‘Self-Care’ REALLY Means, Because It’s Not All Salt Baths And Chocolate Cake

Self-care is often a very unbeautiful thing.

It is making a spreadsheet of your debt and enforcing a morning routine and cooking yourself healthy meals and no longer just running from your problems and calling the distraction a solution.

It is often doing the ugliest thing that you have to do, like sweat through another workout or tell a toxic friend you don’t want to see them anymore or get a second job so you can have a savings account or figure out a way to accept yourself so that you’re not constantly exhausted from trying to be everything, all the time and then needing to take deliberate, mandated breaks from living to do basic things like drop some oil into a bath and read Marie Claire and turn your phone off for the day.

A world in which self-care has to be such a trendy topic is a world that is sick. Self-care should not be something we resort to because we are so absolutely exhausted that we need some reprieve from our own relentless internal pressure.

True self-care is not salt baths and chocolate cake, it is making the choice to build a life you don’t need to regularly escape from.

And that often takes doing the thing you least want to do.

It often means looking your failures and disappointments square in the eye and re-strategizing. It is not satiating your immediate desires. It is letting go. It is choosing new. It is disappointing some people. It is making sacrifices for others. It is living a way that other people won’t, so maybe you can live in a way that other people can’t.

It is letting yourself be normal. Regular. Unexceptional. It is sometimes having a dirty kitchen and deciding your ultimate goal in life isn’t going to be having abs and keeping up with your fake friends. It is deciding how much of your anxiety comes from not actualizing your latent potential, and how much comes from the way you were being trained to think before you even knew what was happening.

The act of self-care has become yet another thing women are expected to be good at. Did you use the right filter for that ‘gram of your impeccably prepared acai bowl? Are the candles you just lit in your Snap story made from organic hand-poured soy or are they that mass-produced factory shit? And how can we stem the inevitable capitalist tide from turning something as simple as self-care into yet another thing to be bought and sold? These are all things I wrestle with as I order Dominos in sweatpants under the guise of ‘being good to myself.’ – quote via Amil Niazi

If you find yourself having to regularly indulge in consumer self-care, it’s because you are disconnected from actual self-care, which has very little to do with “treating yourself” and a whole lot do with parenting yourself and making choices for your long-term wellness.

It is no longer using your hectic and unreasonable life as justification for self-sabotage in the form of liquor and procrastination. It is learning how to stop trying to “fix yourself” and start trying to take care of yourself… and maybe finding that taking care lovingly attends to a lot of the problems you were trying to fix in the first place.

It means being the hero of your life, not the victim. It means rewiring what you have until your everyday life isn’t something you need therapy to recover from. It is no longer choosing a life that looks good over a life that feels good. It is giving the hell up on some goals so you can care about others. It is being honest even if that means you aren’t universally liked. It is meeting your own needs so you aren’t anxious and dependent on other people.

It is becoming the person you know you want and are meant to be. Someone who knows that salt baths and chocolate cake are ways to enjoy life – not escape from it. By Brianna Wiest Thought Catalog.

xxxx,

Janice

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